An Open World PvP Talk

  • Date: 12-12-2009 Views:

    KeyWords: pvp,RvR,mmo,article,Tedeev

  • Summary: Player vs Player (PvP) interaction has long been a large part of gameplay in the majority of MMOs. Ever since it was introduced in various MUDs (multi user text games), it has grown in popularity and became an essential part of a game for a lot of players.

Jaime

An open world PvP Talk

By V Tedeev
V is happy that he took up writing again, something he had dreamed of doing ever since he was nine years old. Being a nonconforming combination of a social party animal and a gamer, he realized that his life amounted not to just games and women, but that he had to pursue his passions and self-development in other areas as well.

An open world PvP

Player vs Player (PvP) interaction has long been a large part of gameplay in the majority of MMOs. Ever since it was introduced in various MUDs (multi user text games), it has grown in popularity and became an essential part of a game for a lot of players.

Over time, however, open world PvP, where you could get attacked anytime and anywhere as long as you weren’t in one of the designated safe spots, drew several criticisms where players would use this system to constantly annoy others and prevent them from enjoying the game fully. Slowly but surely, this kind of PvP was forced out of a lot of MMOs due to the demands of a large portion of gamers. In a modern gaming environment where there are different types of players, some developers tried to address the needs of the majority and introduced different forms of Player vs Player interaction such as RvR (Realm vs Realm) or battle arenas where willing players could fight it out and determine the best among them. PvP in games took a more controlled form which was a compromise between the more PvP orientated crowd and their PvE counterparts. Open PvP in games became much harder to find.

You can ask: "If an RvR system and various arenas suit the majority of players, should we not just leave it that way?" I am here to show you, with the help of my experiences and particular examples, that open PvP can be one of the most thrilling and rewarding aspects of an online game. Today many gamers see RvR as a decent alternative to open world PvP where players can test their skills against each other. I would have to disagree. There hasn’t been a game, to my knowledge, that really relied on strategy more than player numbers in any RvR game. Zergs inevitably bring poor client/server performance issues with them as well as make it more of a concern for developers to ease the strain on the server. That, however, is an issue for another day. Please keep an open mind and read on.

My first game where I have encountered open world PvP was a relatively unknown in Europe but still moderately successful Korean mmorpg called Legend of Mir 2. It was an isometric 3D game where among exploring maps, killing monsters and clearing dungeons, players could attack each other for no reason whatsoever. Loot and equipment had a fairly high chance to drop upon death and you could lose a rare item you’ve been trying to get for days in a 5 minute fight. Needless to say, this made travelling out of towns and villages protected by guards an affair with a certain risk factor to it. You could never know when you would get ambushed by a player killer so you had to have your guard up a lot of the time. More so if you liked to travel alone.

To me, this fact in itself made every dungeon run, every situation, and even a simple run from point A to point B a thrilling event. It added the much needed excitement and variety factors to the game, a welcome addition to the often repetitive gameplay that I faced. As an example, one time I was grinding with a group of friends killing endless groups of zombies and going deeper into the mines in hopes of finding a boss or two and getting some rare items. Half way through the run, another 4 man group entered the room we were clearing. One of them started attacking the mobs we were fighting (whether on purpose or by accident will remain a mystery to this day), some strong words were exchanged and within a minute I found myself in the middle of an intense scuffle. The jolting rush of adrenaline I felt made me realize that this is the fun I was looking for in a game. The spontaneity, the freedom to do what I want and the satisfying feeling of victory I had after we killed them, gathered their dropped loot and tea bagged their corpses – this was the real deal.